Alberta Bats

Alberta Bats


The Alberta Community Bat Program’s mission is to raise awareness of bat conservation issues, help local residents manage bats in buildings, and to collect data needed to monitor and better understand bats in the province.

Contact us if you need help with bats or get involved with bats through citizen science.

News

‘Alberta Guide for Managing Bats in Buildings’ now released!

Alberta bat house guidelines

Great news! We have just released our Alberta Guide for Managing Bats in Buildings. Read this guide for information on bats that use buildings in Alberta, and how to be good stewards of bats on your property. We provide information on how to enhance and maintain building roosts, as well as how to minimize harm to bats that must be excluded from buildings. Also see our resources page for more guides and information about bats.


Social Media Updates

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I heard rumors that bats were spotted flying in Edmonton. Has anyone else seen any? This is about the time of year migratory bats start trickling in. ...

Comment on Facebook

We need an eBird for bats!

Can confirm. Two bats spotted on my walk around bumerius lake last night

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4 days ago

Alberta Community Bat Program

Bat jobs on Hawaii!!! Hawaii's only endemic mammal is the Hawaiian Hoary Bat. Flew there on its own. Biologists think it did that more than once! That's a long flight for a bat! Check it out or pass it along to your favourite bat specialist. #batjobs #batsinparadise #batsWEST is Hiring!!

WEST Careers: Experienced Biological Field Technician, Oahu, Hawaii

Field Technician(s) to help with an acoustic survey to assess Hawaiian hoary bat distribution on the island of Oahu.

For additional information or to apply for this position, please visit: www.west-inc.com/about-west-careers/
...

Bat jobs on Hawaii!!! Hawaiis only endemic mammal is the Hawaiian Hoary Bat. Flew there on its own. Biologists think it did that more than once! Thats a long flight for a bat! Check it out or pass it along to your favourite bat specialist. #batjobs #batsinparadise #bats

4 days ago

Alberta Community Bat Program

It’s BATURDAY! Only two Canadian bats left to go! Today’s bat is the Canyon Bat (Parastrellus hesperus, pronounced “Pair-ah-STRELL-us HESS-per-us) which means “like a pipistrelle” or “like a bat” and hesperus means “evening star”. They are also known as the “Western Pipistrelle” but research has shown that they do not belong to the pipistrelle family (so the name has been changed); some people still refer to them as pipistrelles! Canyon Bats are resident in eastern Washington, so it is possible that we would find them in British Columbia, especially in dry, hot areas such as the south Okanagan or even the southern part of the Kootenay valley. Their record comes from an acoustic detection from the south Okanagan (their call was picked up by a bat detector that had been left out to record bats calling throughout the summer). Biologists have yet to catch one in BC!

They are teeny bats with forearms of 29-31 mm and weigh less than 4 grams (which is about the same as a Canadian nickel!). They are the smallest bat in the USA; these bats are even a little smaller than our Western Small-footed Myotis! They are very light in colour and display a black mask. They eat small insects, small moths, beetles and flies and forage either just after dusk or just before dawn in dry, rocky areas. They don’t move far between summer and winter habitats and they don’t range very far to forage (less than one kilometre) from their summer roost sites. They hunt fom 2-25 metres off the ground and get easily blown off-course by even slight breezes. Perhaps they should have been called “butterfly bats”! They tend not to fly when winds get higher than about 14 km/hour.

Nursery colonies can have 20-30 bat-moms with their babies; and they usually only have one pup per summer. Canyon bats are known to roost under rock slabs under dense vegetation. Some researchers think they may use rodent burrows if they can’t find a suitable roost in a rock crevice. Canyon bats will visit small pools and slow moving water in rivers for a drink shortly after they emerge after sundown but are generally found in dry, arid habitats.

Canadian bat biologists will continue to look for this elusive species!
...

It’s BATURDAY! Only two Canadian bats left to go! Today’s bat is the Canyon Bat (Parastrellus hesperus, pronounced “Pair-ah-STRELL-us HESS-per-us) which means “like a pipistrelle” or “like a bat” and hesperus means “evening star”. They are also known as the “Western Pipistrelle” but research has shown that they do not belong to the pipistrelle family (so the name has been changed); some people still refer to them as pipistrelles! Canyon Bats are resident in eastern Washington, so it is possible that we would find them in British Columbia, especially in dry, hot areas such as the south Okanagan or even the southern part of the Kootenay valley. Their record comes from an acoustic detection from the south Okanagan (their call was picked up by a bat detector that had been left out to record bats calling throughout the summer). Biologists have yet to catch one in BC!

They are teeny bats with forearms of 29-31 mm and weigh less than 4 grams (which is about the same as a Canadian nickel!). They are the smallest bat in the USA; these bats are even a little smaller than our Western Small-footed Myotis! They are very light in colour and display a black mask. They eat small insects, small moths, beetles and flies and forage either just after dusk or just before dawn in dry, rocky areas. They don’t move far between summer and winter habitats and they don’t range very far to forage (less than one kilometre) from their summer roost sites. They hunt fom 2-25 metres off the ground and get easily blown off-course by even slight breezes. Perhaps they should have been called “butterfly bats”! They tend not to fly when winds get higher than about 14 km/hour.

Nursery colonies can have 20-30 bat-moms with their babies; and they usually only have one pup per summer. Canyon bats are known to roost under rock slabs under dense vegetation. Some researchers think they may use rodent burrows if they can’t find a suitable roost in a rock crevice. Canyon bats will visit small pools and slow moving water in rivers for a drink shortly after they emerge after sundown but are generally found in dry, arid habitats.

Canadian bat biologists will continue to look for this elusive species!

The Alberta Community Bat Program is developed in collaboration with:

Wildlife Conservation Society CanadaGovernment of Alberta

This program is supported with funding from:

TD Friends of the Environment FoundationAlberta Ecotrust FoundationEnvironment Canada HSP

Have comments, questions, or require assistance with bats? If so, please let us know!