Alberta Bats

Alberta Bats


The Alberta Community Bat Program’s mission is to raise awareness of bat conservation issues, help local residents manage bats in buildings, and to collect data needed to monitor and better understand bats in the province.

Contact us if you need help with bats or get involved with bats through citizen science.

News

Alberta Community Bat Program joins the Neighbourhood Bat Watch Research Network!

batwatch logo

We enjoyed a very successful launch of our citizen science program in 2016. Now, just in time for the 2017 season, we have partnered with Neighbourhood Bat Watch to work towards creating a national citizen science program for reporting observations of bats and bat roosts. This is an exciting new development and the new system offers excellent opportunities for all Albertans to get involved with bat monitoring. New tools allow users to track roosts and bat observations over time and to map public observations across the province. The Alberta Community Bat Program, in partnership with Alberta Environment and Parks, continues to manage submissions through the program that occur within Alberta. Visit our citizen science page for more information.



‘Alberta Guide for Managing Bats in Buildings’ now released!

Alberta bat house guidelines

Great news! We have just released our Alberta Guide for Managing Bats in Buildings. Read this guide for information on bats that use buildings in Alberta, and how to be good stewards of bats on your property. We provide information on how to enhance and maintain building roosts, as well as how to minimize harm to bats that must be excluded from buildings. Also see our resources page for more guides and information about bats.

Social Media Updates

Visit our Facebook page and our Twitter page for more posts.


12 hours ago

Alberta Community Bat Program

Apparently having small feet doesn't stop you from hanging (and a'swingin') from only one! Western Small-footed Myotis shows off some moves as it grooms itself! This species is blue-listed in Alberta. And although it might look BIG in this video clip, they are about the size of your thumb! Little bats! Thanks to FightWNS for the link! #bats #keepingitclean

Fightwns
Myotis ciliolabrum (western small-footed myotis) grooming and #JustASwingin

#batlove #BeAuTiful

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1 day ago

Alberta Community Bat Program

It's true. Mounting your bat box on a tree is not the best option. People do it and we try to be supportive and excited that they actually care about bats and cared enough to put up a bat box!! Go bat people! But yes, mounting bat houses on trees does cause problems and does not make for an ideal location. Bat boxes on buildings or on poles seem to have the greatest success! Read before you put up your bat boxes! Like people and real estate the three most important things are LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION!! 🙂 (but honestly, THANK YOU for caring about bats!) #bats #batsneedfriends #batboxesTime for an important "Bat Houses 101" lesson on trees! One of the most common mistakes when it comes to bat houses is mounting them on trees instead of on a house, barn, post, side of a chimney, etc. Google search bat houses, and you'll find dozens of photos of them on trees. It’s such a common mistake, that early on in BatBnB’s infancy, we mounted several of our prototypes on trees - which was a mistake. Since that time, we received guidance from our expert advisor, Merlin Tuttle from Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation who enlightened us on the reasons that trees can often be a bad choice for bat houses. We wanted to pass this knowledge onto the BatBnB community.

The reasons trees can be a bad placement choice for bat houses include:

1) Lack of Sunlight. Branches on the tree often block the 6+ hours of sunlight that are desirable to heat the bat house and create ideal conditions for occupancy.

2) Predators. Branches on the tree also often act as a perch for predators who wait for bats to emerge from the house.

3) Blocking Access. For bats attempting to live in your bat house, branches also block access and visibility to your bat house. Your bat house needs to first be seen by a bat and then it needs to be able to easily fly up to and drop away from your bat house.

4) Tree Damage. The screws required to mount your BatBnB can make the tree itself more susceptible to insects and disease. This is a less important risk factor than the sunlight and predation, however.

If you are absolutely inclined towards putting your BatBnB on a tree, make sure you mount the unit at least 15-20 feet up, it should have at least 6+ hours of sunlight, and it should be at least 15-20 feet from the nearest tree branch. While trees aren’t recommended, there are certainly many cases of bat houses on trees being occupied in the past, so nothing is impossible! Always opt for walls or posts though if you can in order to increase your occupancy chances.
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Its true. Mounting your bat box on a tree is not the best option. People do it and we try to be supportive and excited that they actually care about bats and cared enough to put up a bat box!! Go bat people! But yes, mounting bat houses on trees does cause problems and does not make for an ideal location. Bat boxes on buildings or on poles seem to have the greatest success! Read before you put up your bat boxes! Like people and real estate the three most important things are LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION!! :-) (but honestly, THANK YOU for caring about bats!) #bats #batsneedfriends #batboxes

Comment on Facebook

Good to know. Thx

Also the heat from your house makes the bat house more appealing to our lil bat friends!

Kelly Babineau

The Alberta Community Bat Program is developed in collaboration with:

Wildlife Conservation Society CanadaGovernment of Alberta

This program is supported with funding from:

Alberta Ecotrust FoundationAlberta Conservation AssociationThe Chawkers Foundation

TD Friends of the Environment FoundationEnvironment Canada HSP

Have comments, questions, or require assistance with bats? If so, please let us know! Email info@albertabats.ca, phone toll-free (1 866-574-1706), or visit our Contact Page for more options.


Copyright 2017 by Wildlife Conservation Society Canada or its partners