Alberta Bats

Alberta Bats


The Alberta Community Bat Program’s mission is to raise awareness of bat conservation issues, help local residents manage bats in buildings, and to collect data needed to monitor and better understand bats in the province.

Contact us if you need help with bats or get involved with bats through citizen science.

News

Alberta Community Bat Program joins the Neighbourhood Bat Watch Research Network!

batwatch logo

We enjoyed a very successful launch of our citizen science program in 2016. Now, just in time for the 2017 season, we have partnered with Neighbourhood Bat Watch to work towards creating a national citizen science program for reporting observations of bats and bat roosts. This is an exciting new development and the new system offers excellent opportunities for all Albertans to get involved with bat monitoring. New tools allow users to track roosts and bat observations over time and to map public observations across the province. The Alberta Community Bat Program, in partnership with Alberta Environment and Parks, continues to manage submissions through the program that occur within Alberta. Visit our citizen science page for more information.



‘Alberta Guide for Managing Bats in Buildings’ now released!

Alberta bat house guidelines

Great news! We have just released our Alberta Guide for Managing Bats in Buildings. Read this guide for information on bats that use buildings in Alberta, and how to be good stewards of bats on your property. We provide information on how to enhance and maintain building roosts, as well as how to minimize harm to bats that must be excluded from buildings. Also see our resources page for more guides and information about bats.

Social Media Updates

Visit our Facebook page and our Twitter page for more posts.


18 hours ago

Alberta Community Bat Program

Want to learn more about bats? Join Lisa Wilkinson in Miquelon Lake Provincial Park for a talk, display, and guided bat walk!

Want to hear bats? Join us at Grebe Pond, where we will use bat detectors to listen to the echolocation calls of foraging bats. Be sure to dress warm (it gets cold at night) and bring your flashlight. We won't hear bats until after sunset, so expect to be out until at least 11 pm. Kids are welcome if they don't mind late nights!

Friday, July 28, 7:30 pm: Presentation on bats in the Amphitheatre (about 30 minutes)
Friday, July 28, 9:30 pm: Bat Walk at Grebe Pond
Saturday, July 29, 1-3 pm: Bat display and talk to a bat expert in the Visitor Centre
(more events may be announced)

A map of the Miquelon Lake Provincial Park can be found at www.albertaparks.ca/media/3266205/miquelon-lake-tear-sheet.pdf.

Bat Walk and Talk in Miquelon Lake Provincial ParkJul 28, 7:30pmMiquelon Lake Provincial ParkWant to learn more about bats? Join Lisa Wilkinson in Miquelon Lake Provincial Park for a talk, display, and guided bat walk!

Want to hear bats? Join us at Grebe Pond, where we will use bat detectors to listen to the echolocation calls of foraging bats. Be sure to dress warm (it gets cold at night) and bring your flashlight. We won't hear bats until after sunset, so expect to be out until at least 11 pm. Kids are welcome if they don't mind late nights!

Friday, July 28, 7:30 pm: Presentation on bats in the Amphitheatre (about 30 minutes)
Friday, July 28, 9:30 pm: Bat Walk at Grebe Pond
Saturday, July 29, 1-3 pm: Bat display and talk to a bat expert in the Visitor Centre
(more events may be announced)

A map of the Miquelon Lake Provincial Park can be found at www.albertaparks.ca/media/3266205/miquelon-lake-tear-sheet.pdf.
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Bat Walk and Talk in Miquelon Lake Provincial Park

19 hours ago

Alberta Community Bat Program

It's #mothweek!! A big part of conserving any wildlife species is ensuring that the food and habitats they depend on are present and abundant. Bats eat moths! Lots and lots and lots of moths! We have some incredible moth diversity in Alberta. What can you do to support native moth populations? Plant some native plants on your property! When in doubt #gonative! Shrubs, trees, and plants! Happy Moth Week! (aka Happy Bat Dinner Week!) πŸ™‚Happy #NationalMothWeek ! Celebrate by sharing your photos of moths on or around the ASCCA. And don't forget to do your part to help save the dark. Read this article for great tips to do that and view moths. www.darksky.org/like-moths-to-a-flame-national-moth-week-and-how-you-can-help-our-nighttime-wildl... ... See MoreSee Less

Its #mothweek!! A big part of conserving any wildlife species is ensuring that the food and habitats they depend on are present and abundant. Bats eat moths! Lots and lots and lots of moths! We have some incredible moth diversity in Alberta. What can you do to support native moth populations? Plant some native plants on your property! When in doubt #gonative! Shrubs, trees, and plants! Happy Moth Week! (aka Happy Bat Dinner Week!) :-)

Finally got a count for our roost tonight: 10 adults! I thought we only had 2 or 3... Haven't confirmed any pups yet, though, or the species. We're going to try using our trail cam to get some images πŸ˜‰
-Parkland County, AB
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Comment on Facebook

That is fantastic Marion! Maybe try counting again in a week or so - I'm guessing pups are going to start flying in the next two weeks! We would love to see any images you capture! πŸ™‚

2 days ago

Troy Adam Long

I had a bat box that I thought a squirrel was living in and I opened the lid to discover the box was full of bats. The lid is now broken and the bats have departed, if I fix the lid, will they return? It wasn't my intention to destroy their habitat.😒 ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Hi Troy - If you fix the lid, they'll likely return. Bats are pretty loyal to a roost once they find one they like. You'll want to make sure the lid is tightly sealed around the top. It may help to use some caulking to prevent drafts.

Their pups are near the point of being fully grown, so they might have taken off soon regardless of whether you disturbed the roost.

Modern designs typically have spacing between roosting chambers of only 0.75" - 1" (1.9 cm - 2.5 cm). This helps prevent rodents and wasps from establishing in the house. Squirrels are a potential predator of bats (they are one of the top predators of songbird nestlings), so it's best to use designs that exclude them. You can find some information on bat houses at: www.albertabats.ca/bathouses

Thank you so much for getting back to me so quickly. I am ON IT!!! They are beautiful little creatures and we were so excited to discover them! (Although I want to have a word with the head bat as their mosquito consumption is under whelming!!) thanks again!

You're welcome. Sounds like you need a bigger bat house πŸ™‚ And maybe some tree swallow boxes (they are like daytime bats!). The bats, swallows, and dragonflies can usually take out a big chunk of the mosquito population. But I think the mosquitoes might be winning this year.

I fixed the bat box and re-installed! I will send a pic tomorrow. I hope they return! (Fingers crossed)

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The Alberta Community Bat Program is developed in collaboration with:

Wildlife Conservation Society CanadaGovernment of Alberta

This program is supported with funding from:

Alberta Ecotrust FoundationAlberta Conservation AssociationTD Friends of the Environment FoundationEnvironment Canada HSP

Have comments, questions, or require assistance with bats? If so, please let us know!


Copyright 2017 by Wildlife Conservation Society or its partners